The 2017 Season Is Wrapping Up

Yakutat Lodge is finishing up a great season and closing things down for the winter. Fishing is still good, but the weather takes a turn for the worse at this time, and the river becomes to dangerous to continue floating.
If you are considering booking your 2018 trip be sure to contact us with any and all questions or inquiries. We are hoping that you are looking forward to next year as much as we are.
If you have any photos from this year we would love to share them on our social channels and our website. Please send them to yakutatlodgemedia@gmail.com. Thank you to all the guests that have sent photos, keep an eye on the website and social accounts to see your feature.
If you would like to have our 2018 promotions sent directly to your inbox, please send your email address to yakutatlodgemedia@gmail.com and you will be added to our list receiving the opportunity to book our 2018 promotions first.
See you all in the spring of 2018 for a great Steelhead season.

Yakutat Lodge Fishing Report September 12, 2017

Silver Season on the river is in full swing. The fishing is stupid good. Thousands of Silvers entered the system this week and should continue for the several weeks straight. Flies, Jigs, and Spinners are very effective for the aggressive fresh Silvers. All 14 miles of the river is full of fish now and the guides are reporting 40 to 75 fish landed per boat each day.
Ocean conditions remain good for Halibut and Silvers. Although the Silver fishing is slowing down, there are still plenty of residual fish swimming around out there.

The weather has been wet, but not too cold yet.

FISHING REPORT FROM YAKUTAT ALASKA AUGUST 25TH, 2017

Water levels have finally risen from the recent rains and it’s calling for more rain to come, which will keep the river in good shape for the kick off to Silver Season.

The number of Pink Salmon have started to decrease as the Silver numbers are increasing on every tide.

Silver Salmon and Halibut fishing have continued to be exceptional in the bay.

FISHING REPORT FROM YAKUTAT ALASKA AUGUST 15TH, 2017

Ocean fishing for Silvers is still going strong with limits being reached on a daily basis, halibut fishing remains strong, with many fish over a hundred pounds this week.

The river is full of Pink Salmon, about 400,000 to be exact. Silver Salmon are starting to show up in the river on every incoming tide, not in big numbers yet, but that could change any day now. This next 6 weeks will be the time when the most amount of fish are present in the system, and you have the chance at 50 to 100 fish to the boat days. (Mostly Pinks).

 

Awesome Drone Footage Of Salmon Fishing With The Yakutat Lodge Crew

It may be quiet and peaceful out on the river, but it’s not this silent.

Imagine the trickle of the water, splashing of the fish, the chirping of the birds and the humming of the bees. Plus the unexpected sound of the drone flying overhead. This gives you a bird’s eye view as to what a day on the Situk River with the Lodge’s experienced guides is like.

Man and nature as one, untouched and unspoiled. This is what Yakutat has to offer.

Ready to book your next Alaska adventure? Contact The Yakutat Lodge for to answer any and all of your questions about the area or the experience. Call 1-800-YAKUTAT or email info@yakutatlodge.com.

FISHING REPORT FROM YAKUTAT ALASKA JULY 25TH, 2017

Curious about the fishing conditions around The Yakutat Lodge? Wonder no more.

Sockeye reached 66,000 over the weir, and the King count is almost at 600 large. Even though the Sockeye season is coming to a close, the Pink Salmon have started to their march up river in big numbers. 11,000 Pinks over the weir so far, and many more to come over the next month.
Halibut and Coho fishing in the bay has been spectacular, with limits of both being obtained by Noon on a daily basis,(Coho limits are 6 per person in the Ocean). Coho will be arriving in the river system in the next couple weeks, and by mid-August, the river should be full of Pink and Coho Salmon.

Sustainability is Crucial To The Future Alaskan Fishing

The Yakutat Lodge | Fishing Alaska | Yakutat AK

Alaska takes sustainability very seriously. It is one of the most monitored states in all of America when it comes to its fisheries. This is crucial to the survival of the industry. To better understand how Alaska monitors the industry, whose responsibility this is and how to make sure you are following the guidelines head to the Alaska Seafood site. I have referenced much of the material on the site for this article, with the goal of raising awareness and educating the importance of sustainability.

If you’re like most people, you know Alaska for its snow-covered mountains, glaciers that date back millions of years, and the incredible green beauty in the summertime. But the state is also a world model for sustainability—and maybe for governmental genius, too. That’s because Alaska is the only state with a mandate for sustainable seafood written right into its State Constitution.

Alaska offers four types of fishing. Sportfishing is open to anyone in virtually all of Alaska, while commercial, subsistence, and personal use fishing are limited to certain areas, certain types of gear, or just to Alaska residents. But Alaska provides the United States and the world with more then just fish.  

There are many types of seafood that come from Alaska. There are five species of salmon; king, sockeye, coho, keta and pink. There is also a variety of whitefish that are caught there such as; halibut, black cod, Alaska Pollock, cod, sole and surimi seafood. Alaska is also a supplier of various types of crab seafood including; king, snow and Dungeness crab, Alaska Weathervane scallops and spot prawns. 

All told, Alaska supplies more than half of the wild-caught seafood in the United States. And Alaska will always be home to the greatest salmon runs in the world, providing as much as 95 percent of North America’s wild salmon.

With so many What is sustainable seafood? It’s seafood that’s managed and fished using practices that ensure there will always be more to catch in the future.

The secret to Alaska’s success lies in two basic principles: Responsible fisheries management and sustainable fishing practices take care not to harm the fish, other marine plants and animals, nor the environment. n Fish populations are never overfished. Overfishing happens when too many fish are taken from the sea and there are not enough fish left to replenish the natural population.

But how does Alaska make sure the environment stays that way? Start with the Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). More than 40 MPAs, covering hundreds of thousands of square miles have been established in the waters off Alaska to safeguard this sensitive habitat from human activity. This protects more than the wild-caught seafood you enjoy. Whales, sea lions, otters and birds are also ensured safe, clean habitats. Alaska also follows a number of governmental protection acts, including the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the Fur Seal Act, and the Magnuson- Stevens Fishery Conservation Act.

Being sustainable is not just a matter of following the science. It’s a large-scale commitment to responsible fisheries management and a strong governing system.

In Alaska, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Alaska Department of Fish & Game (along with several other organizations at the state, federal and international level) work together to set sustainable fishery management methods that uphold Alaska’s high standards.

The Yakutat Lodge is proud to following all regulations provided by the governing agencies. We respect and appreciate the beauty and resources that Alaska has to offer. We appreciate that we have access to some of the few remaining untouched and pristine nature reserves in all of the U.S. We are happy to answer any questions you might have in regards to planning your next trip to Yakutat. For more information head to our website www.yakutatlodge.com, email us at info@yakutatlodge.com or call us direct at 1-800-YAKUTAT. We look forward to hearing from you and introducing you to the area, no matter what your tastes are.

  • For more information about keeping Alaska Sustainable head to http://www.alaskaseafood.org/

FISHING REPORT FROM YAKUTAT ALASKA July 7th, 2017

Sockeye continue to pour into the Situk on every incoming tide. Commercial fishing on Sunday through Tuesday creates a slight slow down in numbers, but there is still plenty of opportunities to catch a limit of nice fish.
King populations are still down and any deliberate fishing or retention of any size king on the Situk is illegal at this point.

Pink Salmon are starting to show in very low numbers at this point and the Sockeye fishing should remain stellar throughout the month of July.There have also been reports of a couple early Silvers showing up in the commercial nets.

 

FISHING REPORT FROM YAKUTAT ALASKA JUNE 30, 2017

Over 37,000 sockeye over the weir and the river is boiling in certain areas. The confluence of the old and new Situk is stuffed to the rim with Sockeye. Fishing is extremely good also below the weir, where the ocean fresh Sockeye is pouring in on every incoming tide.
The fish at the confluence are starting to show their brilliant red sides and green heads, but they still have all the energy to give a great fight and challenge even the most experienced fisherman to land them. July is shaping up to be a great month for fishing the Situk River.

On the saltwater side of things, the Halibut in the Ocean is really good now, and the Kings in the Bay are still on the bite and running at respectable sizes.

What Makes Yakutat Unique

If you are one of the many individuals that have never heard of Yakutat Alaska you are not alone. Yakutat’s isolated population center is located at the mouth of Yakutat Bay with less than 1000 inhabitants. The total area spanning about 9,400 square miles, of which 7,600 square miles is land and 1,800 square miles is water. Fishing is the main industry in the well-protected area and it is an area only accessible by plane or boat. There are no roads to access this secluded wilderness meaning it is a perfect destination to unwind and reconnect with Mother Nature.

The area of Yakutat is bordered on two sides by Canadian Provinces British Columbia and Yukon and two sides by Alaska. There are main sites to take in within this borough as it contains portions of the protected areas of Chugach National Forest, Glacier Bay National Park, Glacier Bay Wilderness, Tongass National Forest, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Wrangell-Saint Elias Wilderness and the Russell Fjord Wilderness.

One of the many unique features in the Borough is Hubbard Glacier, which is North America’s largest tidewater glacier and one of the only glaciers currently increasing in size yearly rather than decreasing in size. Another unique natural feature in the area is that the mountain range located in Yakutat has 2 or 3 of the top 10 highest peaks in the world 10,000+ feet, which adds to the already spectacular backdrop. In addition there is a near by lake called Pike Lake which was formed during the Ice age and has the oldest species of pike on the planet, dating back its origins to the ice age. These pikes look like something from a prehistoric museum and only exist in this one location. Yakutat also has the largest run if wild steelhead in the world, making it famous for steelhead fishing enthusiasts.

The fishing in the area is also unique, having access to world-class fresh and saltwater locations at your finger tips. If you are fishing for Steelhead, Salmon or other freshwater varieties or if you are chasing halibut or rock fish from the depths of the saltwater Yakutat has trophies of all species and sizes. Having access to saltwater and fresh water in one location offers guests and anglers a very unique fishing opportunity which attracts anglers from around the world. Due to the seclusion of the location you can guarantee that you will not be sharing the waters with many others, which is unique considering iYakutat offers some of the best fishing in all of Alaska. Choosing a trip to Yakutat will be sure to nurture solitude and your connection with the great outdoors.

The surrounding area is not only for fishing, there are other attractions to take in. In summer, surfers travel to the great north for bragging rights of surfing the coldest and most elusive waves on earth. Photography enthusiasts travel from all over the world to take in the sites that have not been touched by man. There are few places on earth that have been left for the modern day explorer. This is one of those locations. If you are a bird enthusiasts, this is the perfect place to catch a glimpse of bald eagles of all maturity levels up close. With the bald eagle being one of the nations most respected species to see such an abundance is quite magical.

The Yakutat Lodge is proud to have the comforts of civilization in one of the few remaining untouched and pristine nature reserves in all of the U.S. We are happy to answer any questions you might have in regards to planning your next trip to Yakutat. For more information head to our website www.yakutatlodge.com, email us at info@yakutatlodge.com or call us direct at 1-800-YAKUTAT. We look forward to hearing from you and introducing you to the area, no matter what your tastes are.